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SAGE & UC Berkeley: Young Global Entrepreneurs compete to drive business innovation

SAGE & UC Berkeley: Young Global Entrepreneurs compete to drive business innovation

Teenage entrepreneurs were coming to the University of California-Berkeley on August 7-12 to take the stage in a worldwide entrepreneurship competition; read more ….

Students for the Advancement of Global Entrepreneurship (SAGE).
SAGE is an international network that links secondary school student organizations to mentors from local universities and businesses. Its purpose is to create a global community of teenage entrepreneurs sharing a common purpose: to make the world a better place. Under the direction of university student mentors, teenage SAGE teams create commercial and social ventures in an ethical and socially responsible manner.

SAGE Global is an international non-profit organization dedicated to teenage entrepreneurs who make the world a better place from the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations. The first and most important goal is to end extreme poverty, according to the UN “the greatest challenge of our time”. There are also goals about health, education, clean drinking water, sustainable energy, less inequality and tackling climate change. SAGE wants to offer young people with a global vision the opportunity to contribute to this. This has become a worldwide success. The SAGE program has been extensively tested and is already running very successfully in 20+ countries.

Last week the country teams (25 countries) were competing against each other on the main stage in San Francisco during the SAGE Global Awards. The Netherlands participated for the first time this year and was represented by a team of three teenage entrepreneurs (Ilse, Lineke and Thijn), coaches (Tine and Bram). The Dutch “Energy Commons” team has been working towards SDG 7 goal #2 through setting up an Energy Common in Groningen, the Netherlands.

SAGE Netherlands works together with The Institute for Future of Living (IFL), Jong Ondernemen/VNO-NCW and SDG Nederland.
Tine van Heerikhuize and Bram Reinders will bring the SAGE competition to the Netherlands and Europe. Via this route a big compliment to Tine and Bram for their leadership and coaching. Investment in our young generation is so essential.

We have been proud to have co-sponsored the Dutch SAGE team participating at the SAGE Global event in San Francisco.

Environmental Data Compendium: Energy consumption by households in NL, 1990-2018

Environmental Data Compendium: Energy consumption by households in NL, 1990-2018

This indicator describes the development of household energy consumption (all energy carriers), excluding transport consumption. Read more …..

Household energy consumption per inhabitant (temperature corrected): between 1990 and 2018, energy consumption per inhabitant fell by 19 percent from 32.8 to 26.5 GJ per inhabitant.
As a result of energy-saving measures such as insulation and the installation of high-efficiency boilers, domestic natural gas consumption decreased by 28 percent from 27 GJ per inhabitant in 1990 to 19.5 GJ per inhabitant in 2018.

In 2018, household electricity consumption per inhabitant was 16 percent higher than in 1990. The share of electricity in total energy consumption per inhabitant also increased between 1990 and 2018, from 11.6 to almost 17 percent.

IEA launched new “Methane Tracker”

IEA launched new “Methane Tracker”

IEA has launched a new “Methane Tracker”, providing a global picture of methane emissions, covering eight industry areas across more than seventy countries.
This tool provides up-to-date estimates of current oil and gas methane emissions, drawing on best available data.
Read more ….

When reading the above, please view the “Climate Action Tracker” as well. It all places matters in an interesting context.
In a previous blog we reported on this tool extensively; click here.
Read more ….

Dutch Climate Agreement

Dutch Climate Agreement

Enough has been written about the recently reached Climate Agreement and in whichever article you analyse, because many people see things from their own perspective, we discover a number of common threads:

  • There are now more action-oriented plans, even though not all proposals are adequate in our perception. But it is a start and let’s get started as time is running out.
  • Built Environment: by 2050, 7 million homes and 1 million buildings must be off natural gas. This means insulating and using sustainable heat and electricity. As a first step, the Dutch Cabinet states, that the first 1.5 million existing homes must be made sustainable by 2030. In 2021, the municipalities will know which district is next, and when. Residents must be involved. So we are talking here about residents- activation, participation, and communication.
  • Agriculture and land use: To be climate neutral in agriculture and land use in 2050, a lot must be done. Part of the greenhouse gas emissions cannot be avoided. Cows produce methane. The sector also captures CO2: in trees, soil and grass. That in turn contributes to the reduction target. Many parties therefore have a role to play in the approach; farmers, site managers, food processors, suppliers, supermarkets and NGOs. So also here a clear bottom-up involvement of organizations is essential.
  • Electricity: In 2030, 70% of all electricity will come from renewable sources. This will be done with wind turbines at sea, on land and with solar panels on roofs and in solar parks. The demand for electricity is growing; eg. cars become electric, the industry opts for clean electricity, buildings are freed from natural gas and will therefore need more electricity. Many measures are needed to keep delivery reliable. And the recent experienced problems that network operators cannot connect new solar parks to the network sufficiently and quickly enough is in stark contrast to this clear objective. We should realise that during the last 10+ years sufficient attention has been requested for smart and sufficient network connections due to the implementation of sustainability measures. Hence effective cooperation is needed between network operators, energy cooperations and neighbourhood associations.
  • Industry: In 2050, the industry will be circular and will virtually no longer emit any greenhouse gases. The factories will then run on sustainable electricity from sun and wind or energy from geothermal energy, hydrogen and biogas. The raw materials come from biomass, residual flows and gases. The residual heat is used by industry itself or it is supplied to horticulture or buildings and homes. In addition to being an energy user, the industry is also a producer and buffer of energy. By 2030, the industry must already emit considerably less CO2. In this context, there is much talk about CO2 charges, including the current functioning of the ETS system. However, there is still a lot of innovation needed and, among other things, subsidies are needed. In addition, it is essential not to lose sight of the level playing field of the industry at the international level. After all, we are not alone. We can still be the best kid in the classroom, which can ultimately result in little value for everyone.
  • Mobility: A lot of effort is being put into creating a sustainable mobility system: mobility without emissions (without harmful exhaust gases), with excellent attainability and accessible to citizens and businesses. There are still quite a number discussions in this area; eg. do the latest plans provide enough guidance and direction? We will continue to inform readers about this; reference is made, among other things, to the Formula E team’s response to the Cabinet’s proposal due to a downward revision of the action perspective; read more ….

Read more about the Climate Agreement….

Heating existing homes on 100% hydrogen

Heating existing homes on 100% hydrogen

On June 25, 2019 for the first time in the Netherlands, existing houses in Rozenburg (ZH) were heated on 100% hydrogen.
Remeha is involved in this project. We naturally keep a close eye on this development. After all, as described earlier in various blogs, we see a very important role for hydrogen in the energy transition.
Read more ….

 

IEA: tracking clean energy progress

IEA: tracking clean energy progress

The IEA is tracking clean energy progress, by assessing the latest information on how critical energy technologies and sectors are contributing to global clean energy transition. It shows that 7 technologies are on track (eg. solar PV, energy storage), 19 require more efforts (eg. offshore wind, hydropower), and 13 are not on track (eg. geothermal, CCUS in industry & transformation). Read more ….

IEA publishes interesting information on Energy storage, EVs, and RD&D Budget Database for Energy technologies

IEA publishes interesting information on Energy storage, EVs, and RD&D Budget Database for Energy technologies

According to IEA, energy storage deployment reached a record level in 2018, nearly doubling from 2017.
Read more ….

Year 2018 was another record-breaking year for global electric car sales (1.98 million), raising total global stock to 5.12 million, according to IEA analyses. Sales increased 68% in 2018….
Read more ….

A very interesting Energy Technology RD&D Budget Database by the IEA allows users to track trends in spending by energy technologies in IEA countries back to 1977.
Read more …..