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IEA: tracking clean energy progress

IEA: tracking clean energy progress

The IEA is tracking clean energy progress, by assessing the latest information on how critical energy technologies and sectors are contributing to global clean energy transition. It shows that 7 technologies are on track (eg. solar PV, energy storage), 19 require more efforts (eg. offshore wind, hydropower), and 13 are not on track (eg. geothermal, CCUS in industry & transformation). Read more ….

IEA publishes interesting information on Energy storage, EVs, and RD&D Budget Database for Energy technologies

IEA publishes interesting information on Energy storage, EVs, and RD&D Budget Database for Energy technologies

According to IEA, energy storage deployment reached a record level in 2018, nearly doubling from 2017.
Read more ….

Year 2018 was another record-breaking year for global electric car sales (1.98 million), raising total global stock to 5.12 million, according to IEA analyses. Sales increased 68% in 2018….
Read more ….

A very interesting Energy Technology RD&D Budget Database by the IEA allows users to track trends in spending by energy technologies in IEA countries back to 1977.
Read more …..

Natural gas-free residential areas

Natural gas-free residential areas

We would like to draw the readers’ attention to recent information from the Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations regarding the “Analysis of project proposals (click here)” and the “Evaluation of pilot projects for natural gas-free residential areas (click here)”.
We would also like to refer you to the EnShared website.

CBS (statistics) Netherlands data on natural gas extraction and energy consumption from renewable sources in NL

CBS (statistics) Netherlands data on natural gas extraction and energy consumption from renewable sources in NL

According to Dutch CBS: Natural gas revenues from gas extraction in NL amount to nearly 417 billion euros.
Read more ….

According to Dutch CBS: in 2018, renewable energy sources accounted for 7.4 percent of total Dutch energy consumption, up from 6.6 percent one year previously.
Solar energy consumption (for electricity and heat) increased by 40 percent. The use of energy from wind only increased by 4 percent (mainly due to onshore wind capacity).
Read more ….

Ecological footprint: action required

Ecological footprint: action required

A recent article by the World Economic Forum really kept me thinking about a subject, which already had been on my mind for quite some time, but it reminded me again of our collective responsibility: how to better manage our ecological footprint.

The article (click here for more information) states regarding the global picture: “Earth Overshoot Day – the point at which humans use more than the world’s resources – takes place earlier and earlier each year. This year it will fall in July. Up until the 1970s, the planet was able to produce more than we consumed on an annual basis: now we are using up resources at a rate of 1.7 Earths a year”.

Viewing the graphs in the article, I must admit I’m quite worried and also shocked that there hasn’t been any real progress to be seen during the last few years.

That we focus on CO2 footprint reduction, in order to limit global warming, is great and essential. Yes, our circular economy thinking is becoming more and more part of our daily lives but does it really encompass all aspects? Shouldn’t our entire personal focus be much more about looking at our own ecological footprint and what our behaviour results into?

To be honest: I need to rethink what this all means for my personal life. We take things for granted, as I live in a part of the world where there are no shortages. Except perhaps the somewhat restricted and smart use of drinking water in case we experience a hot summer, like we did last year.

Shouldn’t we develop more insight into our daily life patterns and what this all means for our ecological footprint. We started to link products now with CO2 emissions over its product lifecycle. From creation, and usage to end of life situation. But to be perfectly honest, we are only in the early stages yet. Yes, I know that when I drive my car, what the CO2 emission has been. The public discussions on meat and its environmental impact is becoming larger. But to know the CO2 numbers for, for example, eating a peanut-butter sandwich few times a week is another thing. You may consider the latter a ‘silly example’, but it illustrates that we must make this subject of ‘ecological footprint’ very concrete and approach it in a very pragmatic manner. And to be honest: we still have a long way to go. So practical guidance is required. And I’m realistic enough to see that this will be a difficult journey, viewing how the Netherlands is struggling with the energy transition and what this means for a normal household.

Hence our, or at least my focus on this subject must change. How to do this most effectively? I’m not sure yet, but at least I will try to do my best. The difficult part will be to change our living habits. The minimum action is to write about it and to create discussion and hence awareness. Not by pointing fingers, but by engaging each other in information-sharing encounters. Because by knowing and realising, we can act better.

Ideally each product should have, besides the obvious euro value, a CO2 value and an Eco value. I recently mentioned to a colleague: let’s use the analogy of the airmiles card, and see if we can visualise each product into actual environmental contributions and savings. We have the technologies to support us, so nothing is stopping us, except perhaps our own willingness.

Note: The author of this article, Thijs Aarten, is involved with various transition projects.

IEA interesting article: “Have the prices from competitive auctions become the “new normal” prices for renewables?”

IEA interesting article: “Have the prices from competitive auctions become the “new normal” prices for renewables?”

IEA mentions: “The use of competitive auctions has accelerated cost reductions for renewable technologies, such as solar PV, onshore wind and offshore wind, establishing price benchmarks that are recognised worldwide. However, these prices cannot be consistently followed, as each country and technology has different resource potentials, financing conditions and auction designs”.

In her article, the IEA further states: “overall trends show that recent bid prices for onshore wind and solar PV technologies for projects to be commissioned by 2023 range from USD 20 per megawatt hour (MWh) to USD 50/MWh. This corresponds to a 45-50% reduction in contract price for both technologies from 2017 to 2022/23; for offshore wind, the decline is almost two-thirds. It must be noted, however, that these auction prices are based on just a small portion of the total capacity to be commissioned under competitively determined remuneration schemes in the main-case forecast, so average prices may change with the announcement of new auctions. In addition, announced contract prices need to be verified as project delivery schedules and final costs may differ.”

Read more …..

Court of Amsterdam (publication 12-4-2019) has rejected a renovation proposal from a local housing corporation, to make apartments “zero on the meter homes”

Court of Amsterdam (publication 12-4-2019) has rejected a renovation proposal from a local housing corporation, to make apartments “zero on the meter homes”

Read more (text is in Dutch language) …..

We will closely follow this development.

In any case, it confirms our position that sufficient transparency and independent information is required for residents (owners and/or tenants) to be able to make good choices.
EnShared and Zonatlas are therefore affiliated and active with the national Coalition ‘Samen Duurzaam Doen” (translated: Doing Sustainability Together), and they work closely with the “Institute for Future of Living” (https://instituteforfutureofliving.org/).

More information will follow.