Climate policy

The importance that the Dutch people attach to climate

The importance that the Dutch people attach to climate

Source: Dutch government

Commissioned by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate (EZK), research agency Kantar conducted a flash survey of the importance that the Dutch people attach to climate and the things that are already being done with regard to sustainability and sustainable behaviour.

Few conclusions:

  • More than seven in ten Dutch people (72%) are (much) concerned about the climate.
  • For most Dutch people (81%), their opinion on climate issues has not been influenced by the corona crisis.
  • More than four in ten Dutch people (42%) know what they can do for a better climate, but find it difficult to apply this.

I find this a remarkable (positive) result that I did not expect. Read more ….

IRENA (April 2020): Global Renewables Outlook

IRENA (April 2020): Global Renewables Outlook

IRENA’s Global Renewables Outlook, issued April 2020, presents various interesting scenarios; also in the context of global economic stimulus and recovery plans due to the COVID-19 crisis. Please click here for further information.

The challenges of ensuring sustainability, strengthening resilience and improving people’s health and welfare cannot be viewed in isolation but should be addressed from an holistic point of view. The health-, humanitarian-,  and economic crises, resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, should accelerate the decarbonisation of our societies, as it presents all sorts of opportunities. See also our blog published on April 19th; click here for more information.

EU Green Deal

EU Green Deal

Shortly after her appointment, the European Commission, through its President Ursula von der Leyen, and Executive Vice-President Frans Timmermans, presented a startling plan (the European Green Deal) to reach the required climate targets by 2050. This plan offers many opportunities for residents and businesses. The European Commission is showing leadership that is highly desirable.

According to the European Commission:

The European Green Deal is about improving the well-being of people. Making Europe climate-neutral and protecting our natural habitat will be good for people, planet and economy. No one will be left behind.

The EU will be climate neutral in 2050. The Commission will propose a European Climate Law turning the political commitment into a legal obligation and a trigger for investment. Reaching this target will require action by all sectors of our economy:

  • Decarbonise the energy sector
  • Renovate buildings, to help people cut their energy bills and energy use
  • Support industry to innovate and to become global leaders in the green economy
  • Roll out cleaner, cheaper and healthier forms of private and public transport

Read more ….

UN Climate Change Conference – December 2019 (COP 25)

UN Climate Change Conference – December 2019 (COP 25)

According to the UNFCCC and organisers, the UN Climate Change conference is all about: “The conference is designed to take the next crucial steps in the UN climate change process. Following agreement on the implementation guidelines of the Paris Agreement at COP 24 in Poland last year, a key objective is to complete several matters with respect to the full operationalization of the Paris Climate Change Agreement. The conference furthermore serves to build ambition ahead of 2020, the year in which countries have committed to submit new and updated national climate action plans. Crucial climate action work will be taken forward in areas including finance, the transparency of climate action, forests and agriculture, technology, capacity building, loss and damage, indigenous peoples, cities, oceans and gender.
Read more ….

Dutch Climate Agreement

Dutch Climate Agreement

Enough has been written about the recently reached Climate Agreement and in whichever article you analyse, because many people see things from their own perspective, we discover a number of common threads:

  • There are now more action-oriented plans, even though not all proposals are adequate in our perception. But it is a start and let’s get started as time is running out.
  • Built Environment: by 2050, 7 million homes and 1 million buildings must be off natural gas. This means insulating and using sustainable heat and electricity. As a first step, the Dutch Cabinet states, that the first 1.5 million existing homes must be made sustainable by 2030. In 2021, the municipalities will know which district is next, and when. Residents must be involved. So we are talking here about residents- activation, participation, and communication.
  • Agriculture and land use: To be climate neutral in agriculture and land use in 2050, a lot must be done. Part of the greenhouse gas emissions cannot be avoided. Cows produce methane. The sector also captures CO2: in trees, soil and grass. That in turn contributes to the reduction target. Many parties therefore have a role to play in the approach; farmers, site managers, food processors, suppliers, supermarkets and NGOs. So also here a clear bottom-up involvement of organizations is essential.
  • Electricity: In 2030, 70% of all electricity will come from renewable sources. This will be done with wind turbines at sea, on land and with solar panels on roofs and in solar parks. The demand for electricity is growing; eg. cars become electric, the industry opts for clean electricity, buildings are freed from natural gas and will therefore need more electricity. Many measures are needed to keep delivery reliable. And the recent experienced problems that network operators cannot connect new solar parks to the network sufficiently and quickly enough is in stark contrast to this clear objective. We should realise that during the last 10+ years sufficient attention has been requested for smart and sufficient network connections due to the implementation of sustainability measures. Hence effective cooperation is needed between network operators, energy cooperations and neighbourhood associations.
  • Industry: In 2050, the industry will be circular and will virtually no longer emit any greenhouse gases. The factories will then run on sustainable electricity from sun and wind or energy from geothermal energy, hydrogen and biogas. The raw materials come from biomass, residual flows and gases. The residual heat is used by industry itself or it is supplied to horticulture or buildings and homes. In addition to being an energy user, the industry is also a producer and buffer of energy. By 2030, the industry must already emit considerably less CO2. In this context, there is much talk about CO2 charges, including the current functioning of the ETS system. However, there is still a lot of innovation needed and, among other things, subsidies are needed. In addition, it is essential not to lose sight of the level playing field of the industry at the international level. After all, we are not alone. We can still be the best kid in the classroom, which can ultimately result in little value for everyone.
  • Mobility: A lot of effort is being put into creating a sustainable mobility system: mobility without emissions (without harmful exhaust gases), with excellent attainability and accessible to citizens and businesses. There are still quite a number discussions in this area; eg. do the latest plans provide enough guidance and direction? We will continue to inform readers about this; reference is made, among other things, to the Formula E team’s response to the Cabinet’s proposal due to a downward revision of the action perspective; read more ….

Read more about the Climate Agreement….

Natural gas-free residential areas

Natural gas-free residential areas

We would like to draw the readers’ attention to recent information from the Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations regarding the “Analysis of project proposals (click here)” and the “Evaluation of pilot projects for natural gas-free residential areas (click here)”.
We would also like to refer you to the EnShared website.

IEA interesting article: “Have the prices from competitive auctions become the “new normal” prices for renewables?”

IEA interesting article: “Have the prices from competitive auctions become the “new normal” prices for renewables?”

IEA mentions: “The use of competitive auctions has accelerated cost reductions for renewable technologies, such as solar PV, onshore wind and offshore wind, establishing price benchmarks that are recognised worldwide. However, these prices cannot be consistently followed, as each country and technology has different resource potentials, financing conditions and auction designs”.

In her article, the IEA further states: “overall trends show that recent bid prices for onshore wind and solar PV technologies for projects to be commissioned by 2023 range from USD 20 per megawatt hour (MWh) to USD 50/MWh. This corresponds to a 45-50% reduction in contract price for both technologies from 2017 to 2022/23; for offshore wind, the decline is almost two-thirds. It must be noted, however, that these auction prices are based on just a small portion of the total capacity to be commissioned under competitively determined remuneration schemes in the main-case forecast, so average prices may change with the announcement of new auctions. In addition, announced contract prices need to be verified as project delivery schedules and final costs may differ.”

Read more …..

Carbon Tracker news [April 2, 2019]

Carbon Tracker news [April 2, 2019]

Key excerpts of a joint letter are provided below which was signed by a group of 60 investors, academics, business and faith leaders and NGOs (including Carbon Tracker) and sent to Fatih Birol and the International Energy Agency (IEA) governing council chair;
1) Make clear that the ‘New Policies Scenario (NPS)’ is a business as usual scenario that charts a dangerous course to a world with between 2.7ºC and 3ºC of warming. …..
2 ) Develop an updated, fully transparent, ‘Sustainable Development Scenario’’ (SDS) to reflect the full range of ambition of the Paris goals and make this the central reference of the WEO . This scenario should include a reasonable probability (66%) of limiting warming to 1.5ºC; a longer time horizon (beyond 2040); and a precautionary approach to negative emissions technologies. ……
Read more ….