Innovations & Developments

Global scale-up of Solar and Wind energy and what’s ahead of us?

Global scale-up of Solar and Wind energy and what’s ahead of us?

The research company BloombergNEF (BNEF) opened a recent article with the following sentences: “Solar PV and onshore wind are now the cheapest sources of new-build generation for at least two-thirds of the global population.” And they continued in the same paragraph: “Battery storage is now the cheapest new-build technology for peaking purposes (up to two-hours of discharge duration) in gas-importing regions, like Europe, China or Japan.”.

Reading BNEF’s research it confirmed our own views that a major structural change in our energy system is happening. The International Energy Agency (IEA) in a separate article not only emphasised the fact that the Covid-19 pandemic has created the largest shock to the global energy system in more than seven decades, but is also observing a major shift towards low-carbon sources of electricity. IEA states in a recent message: “low-carbon sources are set to extend their lead this year to reach 40% of global electricity generation”.

Affordable battery storage will significantly enhance the integration of decentralised sustainable energy generation on a large scale, providing nice benefits to individual households and businesses.

Very interesting reports and news facts and hence we recommend you to read the following:

IRENA (April 2020): Global Renewables Outlook

IRENA (April 2020): Global Renewables Outlook

IRENA’s Global Renewables Outlook, issued April 2020, presents various interesting scenarios; also in the context of global economic stimulus and recovery plans due to the COVID-19 crisis. Please click here for further information.

The challenges of ensuring sustainability, strengthening resilience and improving people’s health and welfare cannot be viewed in isolation but should be addressed from an holistic point of view. The health-, humanitarian-,  and economic crises, resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, should accelerate the decarbonisation of our societies, as it presents all sorts of opportunities. See also our blog published on April 19th; click here for more information.

Knowledge Platform EMV provides answers to questions about electric and/or magnetic fields

Knowledge Platform EMV provides answers to questions about electric and/or magnetic fields

By making our home more sustainable and with the introduction of the electric car, we are introducing all kinds of new technologies into our lives. Thinking of for instance solar panels and associated inverters, heat pumps, electric cooking, use of apps to monitor energy consumption, the electric car with battery, charging points for electric cars, etc. When installing an Energy Management System (EMS), various devices in our home will communicate with each other via wireless connections.

These useful devices, aimed at a sustainable society, cause electric fields and/or magnetic fields. By the way, our TV, the computer and other electrical devices do that too. This can raise questions such as: how strong are these fields? Do the electromagnetic fields have potential negative health effects?

Fortunately, we have an independent Knowledge Platform in the Netherlands, the Knowledge Platform ElectroMagnetic Fields and Health (EMV), which provides clear answers and information to public questions or concerns. The Knowledge Platform EMV includes: RIVM, TNO, DNV GL, GGD GHOR Netherlands, Telecom Agency, ZonMw and Milieu Centraal. The Health Council of the Netherlands has an advisory function.

For information about the electrical appliances in our home and/or other subjects, please refer to: https://www.kennisplatform.nl/huis-machines-en-vervoer/

For more general information; click here.

Production of sustainable electricity in the Netherlands has risen / strong growth solar power in 2019

Production of sustainable electricity in the Netherlands has risen / strong growth solar power in 2019

In an article published today, Statistics Netherlands (CBS) states:
“In 2019, electricity production from renewable sources amounted to 21.8 billion kilowatt hours (kWh), in 2018 this was 18.5 billion kWh. Windmills had the largest share of this, at 49 percent, but this has fallen compared to 2018 (54 percent). Biomass accounted for 26 percent, solar power for 24 percent of renewable energy production. Renewable electricity production accounted for 18 percent of electricity consumption in the Netherlands in 2019, compared to 15 percent in 2018. ”

CBS further concludes:
“40 percent more solar power through more solar panels. The production of electricity with solar panels increased from 3.7 billion kWh in 2018 to 5.2 billion kWh in 2019. That is an increase of more than 40 percent, which is directly related to the increase in the installed capacity of solar panels. The total capacity of solar panels grew by approximately 2 400 megawatts in 2019, and is estimated at 6 900 megawatts. The largest part of this increase (70 percent, or 1 700 megawatt) is due to new, large installations on roofs of buildings and on the ground. ”

Read more ….

Global energy-related CO2 emissions flattened in 2019

Global energy-related CO2 emissions flattened in 2019

IEA recently stated: “Global energy-related CO2 emissions flattened in 2019 at around 33 gigatonnes (Gt), following two years of increases.”.
Interesting to see the reductions (and their reasons) in the period 2018-2019 in Europe, USA and Japan, against an increase in the rest of the world.
Read more …..

CROW: sustainability score municipalities

CROW: sustainability score municipalities

For several years, CROW (*) has been maintaining a sustainability dashboard with a ranking of Dutch municipalities. Sustainability is based on several factors, including charging infrastructure.
(*): CROW is an independent knowledge platform; click here for more information.

CROW states: “The sustainability score gives an indication of the sustainability of mobility in municipalities.”. Good to read this and reflect on the current situation in the municipality concerned. Read more …..

Energy Common Leidschendam-Voorburg

Energy Common Leidschendam-Voorburg

The cooperative Energy Common Leidschendam-Voorburg (EC-LV) was established on February 6, 2020. The foundation Energy Commons Institute (ECI) has assisted in the establishment and continues to support this Energy Common.
After all, “doing together” makes us stronger. Read more on the EC-LV website.

CBS: Dutch material consumption per inhabitant is lower than the EU average and the raw material footprint per inhabitant is smaller

CBS: Dutch material consumption per inhabitant is lower than the EU average and the raw material footprint per inhabitant is smaller

On February 21, 2020, Dutch CBS published positive and relevant news: “The use of materials in the Dutch economy has risen since 2000 and relatively more raw materials come from abroad. Nevertheless, there is progress in the area of material and raw material use. The Netherlands consumed more than 20 percent fewer materials in 2018 than in 2000. Dutch material consumption per inhabitant is lower than the EU average and the raw material footprint per inhabitant is smaller. Read more about the CBS analysis by clicking on the link.

EU Green Deal

EU Green Deal

Shortly after her appointment, the European Commission, through its President Ursula von der Leyen, and Executive Vice-President Frans Timmermans, presented a startling plan (the European Green Deal) to reach the required climate targets by 2050. This plan offers many opportunities for residents and businesses. The European Commission is showing leadership that is highly desirable.

According to the European Commission:

The European Green Deal is about improving the well-being of people. Making Europe climate-neutral and protecting our natural habitat will be good for people, planet and economy. No one will be left behind.

The EU will be climate neutral in 2050. The Commission will propose a European Climate Law turning the political commitment into a legal obligation and a trigger for investment. Reaching this target will require action by all sectors of our economy:

  • Decarbonise the energy sector
  • Renovate buildings, to help people cut their energy bills and energy use
  • Support industry to innovate and to become global leaders in the green economy
  • Roll out cleaner, cheaper and healthier forms of private and public transport

Read more ….