Renewable energy

ACM: transmission tariffs cannot be an impediment to the construction of power storages

ACM: transmission tariffs cannot be an impediment to the construction of power storages

Note: ACM stands for The Dutch Authority for Consumers and Markets.

ACM reports on her website the following: “The different components of the transmission tariffs for electricity cannot be an impediment to the construction and development of power storage installations.” Read more by clicking here. A very good development for all homeowners and companies that want to become more sustainable.

 

For the recently performed market scan, click here for more information. (note the article is in the Dutch language).

IEA report: “Empowering Cities for a Net Zero Future”

IEA report: “Empowering Cities for a Net Zero Future”

In this IEA report, it’s mentioned that cities account for more than 50% of the global population, 80% of global GDP, two-thirds of global energy consumption and more than 70% of annual global carbon emissions. According to IEA, these factors are expected to grow significantly in the coming decades: it is anticipated that by 2050 more than 70% of the world’s population will live in cities, resulting in massive growth in demand for urban energy infrastructure. Read more by clicking here ……

European Commission legislative package “Fit for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels”

European Commission legislative package “Fit for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels”

On July 14, 2021, the European Commission adopted a package of proposals to make the EU’s climate, energy, land use, transport and taxation policies fit for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels.  Quite a lot has been published in the media about these plans, but we only refer to the following link, which clearly shows the details. Please click here for further information ……

IEA-COP26 Net Zero Summit on March 31, 2021

IEA-COP26 Net Zero Summit on March 31, 2021

We recommend readers to refer to the summary and video of the IEA, by clicking attached link.

The Summit is an important event on the road to COP26 in Glasgow in November 2021. It brought together decisionmakers and representatives of more than 40 countries covering more than 80% of global GDP, population and emissions. Focus was on the critical need for international collaboration and policy implementation to accelerate clean energy transitions. On May 18, the IEA will publish a wide-ranging roadmap for the global energy sector to reach net-zero emissions by 2050. Good to continue monitoring these important developments.

Role of nuclear energy in the energy transition

Role of nuclear energy in the energy transition

We read with interest a recent article in the Dutch newspaper FD, in which prominent figures of the political party D66 advise the next Dutch government to seriously consider a role for nuclear energy from 2030. Our advice is to do this from a European perspective.

We would therefore like to recommend the politicians and readers of this website to also read the 2010 study by the European Climate Foundation (ECF). We have written about this before in previous blogs, but we would like to make reference to the Roadmap 2050 website again; https://www.roadmap2050.eu/.  The various reports (Roadmap 2050 (click here), Power Perspective 2030 (click here)) also clearly describe the role of nuclear energy. We understand the concerns and questions about how to deal with radioactive waste, but we believe that responsible solutions are (will be) available.

Netherlands: discussion about phasing out solar panel netting scheme (“Salderingsregeling”)

Netherlands: discussion about phasing out solar panel netting scheme (“Salderingsregeling”)

The Dutch House of Representatives (“Tweede Kamer”) recently declared the bill to phase out the netting scheme for solar panels definitively controversial. The law will only be discussed in the House of Representatives after the upcoming national elections on March 17, 2021.

This development creates uncertainty for individual households and companies. On the other hand, people know that solar energy must be fully used. As part of a necessary energy transition and also necessary to achieve the Dutch climate goals. We can therefore assume that it will remain interesting for households and companies to invest in solar energy systems.

Follow the developments via the good newsletters from “Solar Magazine”; Click here for more information.

TenneT report: Monitoring security of supply of electricity in the Netherlands

TenneT report: Monitoring security of supply of electricity in the Netherlands

Security of supply of electricity is not an issue in the short term in the Netherlands. In the context of the (hopefully) growing energy transition and the greater dependency on generated renewable energy (wind and solar), the very interesting TenneT report provides useful observations and advice.

This report shows the need for an effective integrated European energy policy. Interconnections between countries are crucial here. The report also shows the need for good monitoring methodologies. For more information, we refer to the website of TenneT which also contains summaries in English: https://www.tennet.eu/nl/bedrijf/publicaties/rapport-monitoring-leveringszekerheid/

If we reflect on the TenneT report, the study by the European Climate Foundation (ECF) from 2010, in which KEMA has been involved, comes to mind. We have already written about this in previous blogs, but we would like to make reference again to the Roadmap 2050 website; https://www.roadmap2050.eu/. It is certainly worthwhile to read and reflect on the different studies, even though we are now 11 years later.

Potential of Green Hydrogen

Potential of Green Hydrogen

As can be viewed from previous blogs, we keep a close eye on the Hydrogen developments worldwide.

The International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) shows on their website an extremely useful overview of the possibilities and applications of Green Hydrogen. Furthermore it makes a good distinction between Fossil fuel based grey hydrogen, blue hydrogen, turquoise hydrogen and green hydrogen. Costs developments are elaborated and show the full potential in the areas of energy transition. For further detail, please click here ….

Notes:  the various types of Hydrogen are nicely shown by IRENA on their website:

  • Fossil fuel based grey hydrogen (source = methane of coal; process = steam methane reforming (SMR) or gasification).
  • Blue hydrogen (source = methane or coal; process = SMR or gasification with carbon capture).
  • Turquoise hydrogen (source = methane; process = pyrolysis).
  • Green hydrogen (source = renewable electricity (e.g. offshore wind energy and solar energy); process = electrolysis).
  • Majority of hydrogen produced today is grey hydrogen, but the potential for green hydrogen is huge.

We also refer to previous articles on our website:

Other interesting references are:

IEA Renewables 2020 report: interesting dynamic data-dashboard

IEA Renewables 2020 report: interesting dynamic data-dashboard

IEA has included in their Renewables 2020 report a very interesting dynamic data-dashboard, which will enable readers to examine historical data and investigate forecasts for various sectors and technologies.

By clicking this link, one can see what this means for PV residential systems in the Netherlands.

We’re grateful for these innovative and insightful developments by IEA !

More insight helps us all make the right decisions at the level of individual households, companies, regions and nations.

External views through smart benchmarking, then local action and also international cooperation

External views through smart benchmarking, then local action and also international cooperation

We must understand developments globally to become stronger locally.

Two particular references I would like to mention in this context. The conclusions, which one can draw from these statistics and overviews, are straightforward and I leave this up to the individual reader.

 

IEA: Energy Technology RD&D Budgets 2020

I can really recommend the reader to look at IEA’s Energy Technology RD&D Budgets 2020.

These overviews include data on budgets in specific IEA member countries and the database shows RD&D budgets and various indicators. One ought to be cautious when interpreting the absolute figures. Nevertheless, it shows the money being spent on national level and in which areas.

With compliments to the IEA who states on their website: “The complete IEA Energy Technology RD&D Budget Database can be accessed for free through IEA Data Services by logging in as GUEST. Please see the documentation, manual, or questionnaire for additional information.”.

For more information on this wealth of information provided by IEA, please click here.

 

Share of renewable energy in EU member states (source: Eurostat Statistics)

The “Eurostat Statistics Explained” provide useful and clear insights.

For instance, the Renewable energy statistics give the following results:

  • Share of renewable energy nearly doubled between 2004 and 2018.
  • In 2018, renewable energy represented 18.9% of energy consumed in the EU, compared with 9.6% in 2004 – the 2020 target is 20%.
  • The share of energy from renewable sources used in transport activities in the EU reached 8.3% in 2018.

If one views how the Netherlands is doing in all of this, the following results:

  • Netherlands takes last (27th) place in the graph presented by Eurostat on “Share of energy from renewable sources in the EU Member States (2018, in % of gross final energy consumption)” – click here.
  • A more positive picture for the Netherlands (4th place measured from the top) is viewed when studying the graph “Share of energy from renewable sources in transport (2018, in % of gross final energy consumption)” – click here.

As a Dutchman, but very much being the European and mostly the global citizen for ecological issues, I obviously want my country to do much better in what I’ve extracted from the Eurostat data. Hence, some of the key questions should be; why are the other countries doing ‘better’, and what’s hindering us from performing as requested? What can we learn from the top performers on our national, regional and local levels? These questions stimulate the international cooperation in large implementation projects. Where organisations from many countries with good diversity are participating. And once finished, we share the lessons learnt and best practices.

For more information on the Eurostat statistics, please click here.